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#607 : Aller de l'avant

Les Crawley vont voir Henry concourir à un événement de courses automobiles, un événement qui laisse Mary ébranlée. Violet établit un plan qui étonne la famille mais enchante Miss Denker et en apprend plus sur les intentions d'Amelia de se lier d'amitié avec Isobel. Molesley et Daisy participent aux épreuves lors du jour de l'examen, le secret d'Andy est révélé, Thomas se sent isolé et Mme Patmore et Mme Hughes donnent une leçon à Carson.

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Titre VO
Episode 7

Titre VF
Aller de l'avant

Première diffusion
01.11.2015

Première diffusion en France
26.12.2015

Vidéos

Promo (VO)

Promo (VO)

  

Promo 2 (VO)

Promo 2 (VO)

  

Diffusions

Logo de la chaîne TV Breizh

France (redif)
Jeudi 25.08.2016 à 20:50

Logo de la chaîne TMC

France (inédit)
Samedi 26.12.2015 à 20:50
0.81m

Logo de la chaîne ITV

Grande-Bretagne (inédit)
Dimanche 01.11.2015 à 21:00
7.54m

Plus de détails

Captures | Tournage

Réalisateur : David Evans

Scénariste : Julian Fellowes

 

Distributions :

Maggie Smith... Violet Crawley, Dowager Countess of Grantham
Hugh Bonneville... Robert Crawley, Comte de Grantham
Laura Carmichael... Lady Edith Crawley
Jim Carter... Charles Carson
Raquel Cassidy... Phyllis Baxter
Brendan Coyle... John Bates
Michelle Dockery... Lady Mary Crawley
Kevin Doyle... Molesley
Michael Fox... Andy
Joanne Froggatt... Anna Smith
Matthew Goode... Henry Talbot
Rob James-Collier... Thomas Barrow
Allen Leech... Tom Branson
Phyllis Logan... Elsie Hughes
Elizabeth McGovern... Cora Crawley, Comtesse de Grantham
Sophie McShera... Daisy Robinson Mason
Lesley Nicol... Beryl Patmore
Penelope Wilton... Isobel Crawley

 

Guests Stars :

Sebastian Dunn (Charlie Rogers), Phoebe Sparrow (Amelia Cruikshank), Jeremy Swift (Spratt), Sue Johnston (Miss Denker), Paul Copley (Mr Mason), Antonia Bernath (Laura Edmunds), Samantha Bond (Lady Rosamund), Harry Hadden-Paton (Bertie Pelham), Patrick Brennan (Mr Dawes), Christos Lawton (Billy), Hayley Jayne Standing (Lucy), Peter Hamilton Dyer (Commentateur de course), Jake Rowley (Paparazzi)

OPENING CREDITS

 

EXT. CAR RACE TRACK

 

Henry and Charlie have finished to practice.

 

HENRY: Tell me the worst, Billy.

BILLY: I'm afraid Mr Rogers beat you by three-and-a-half seconds, Mr Talbot.

CHARLIE: Take it like a man, Henry. Can I help it if I am your superior?

HENRY: You want a drink?

CHARLIE: Why not?

HENRY: See you there. Thanks, Billy.

 

INT. BREAKFAST ROOM

 

Robert read a letter.

 

ROBERT: Well, this is very nice.

EDITH: What is?

ROBERT: Mary's beau, Henry Talbot, has invited us all to watch him drive at Brooklands next week.

EDITH: He's just sucking up.

MARY: Mama won't ever let you go.

ROBERT: I don't see why not.

MARY: Because you're still convalescing.

ROBERT: I only want to watch the race, not drive in it.

EDITH: It's a long way, and it won't last much more than ten minutes.

TOM: He told me he's inviting Bertie Pelham.

MARY: Oh.

TOM: What about you, Mary?

MARY: I think I've talked myself into it, although I'm sure I'll be sorry.

 

INT. KITCHENS

 

DAISY: Just think! It's finished and open for business. You are the owner of a bed-and-breakfast hotel.

ANDY: What have you had done?

MRS PATMORE: I turned a bedroom into a bathroom and I've installed an inside privy.

DAISY: Think of that.

MRS PATMORE: It leaves me two bedrooms to let, and one for my niece to run it.

DAISY: Which is yours when the time comes.

MRS PATMORE: Mmm, when the time comes.

(Hughes comes in)

HUGHES: All you need now are some clients and that will happen soon enough.

MRS PATMORE: How's life for the newly-weds?

HUGHES: Fine. Only, Mr Carson wants to dine at the cottage again.

MRS PATMORE: No need to sound so gloomy. I can rustle up something.

HUHGES: Whatever you do rustle up, I won't cook it right, or the plates will be cold, or the dressing will be wrong.

DAISY: Does he appreciate all you do?

HUGHES: Does any man?

(Molesley just take a minute to announce something)

MOLESLEY: Ooh, Daisy. Mr Dawes has been given a date by the examining board.

DAISY: Blimey, when is it?

MOLESLEY: The 20th.

DAISY: Oh, my God!

HUGHES: I will thank you not to take the name of the Lord in vain.

DAISY: I hope it's not in vain! I need all the help I can get!

 

INT. GRANTHAM’S HOUSE

 

Isobel shows to Violet the invitation she received about Larry’s weeding.

 

VIOLET: Do you enjoy weddings?

ISOBEL: Yes. But I'm not going to that one. I'd feel like the wicked fairy at the christening of Sleeping Beauty.

VIOLET: Why would Larry Grey want you to be there? I mean, you of all people.

ISOBEL: I'm sure he doesn't. Dickie must've persuaded them to ask me.

VIOLET: I doubt that. He wouldn't want to subject you to more insults.

ISOBEL: Well, who then?

VIOLET: I'd say this is the work of Miss Cruikshank. She's the one always making a show of friendship. Why don't I pay a call on her? See if I can winkle out the truth.

ISOBEL: I'm sorry I showed it to you now.

VIOLET: Oh, don't be, don't be. Are things going well in my former kingdom?

ISOBEL: Cora is settling in. I know it must feel awkward.

VIOLET: Oh, no. I'm yesterday, she's tomorrow. That's the way it is.

ISOBEL: You must be feeling very hurt.

VIOLET: Well, the fact is, I might as well be honest. I am angry at the way I have been treated.

ISOBEL: I don't blame you.

VIOLET: While angry, I say things some people find hard to forgive. So, I have decided to go away. I'd rather vent my rage on the desert air... and return when I've regained control of my tongue.

ISOBEL: Your self-knowledge is an example to us all.

VIOLET: You don't think I'm wrong?

ISOBEL: The last thing you need at this stage in your life is to quarrel with your son and daughter-in-law.

VIOLET: Precisely. But don't fear. I'll call on Miss Cruikshank before I leave.

ISOBEL: I suspect she's quite a tough nut.

VIOLET: And I'm quite a tough nutcracker.

 

INT. SERVANTS’ ROOM

 

Servants finish to take the breakfast.

 

ANDY: How's Mr Mason getting on? I'm always ready if he needs any help.

DAISY: I'm going down there this afternoon, I'll tell him you said so.

 

THOMAS: I am trying to find a position, Mr Carson, honestly.

CARSON: I don't say you're not, but it doesn't seem quite fair on His Lordship to string it out.

THOMAS: Does that mean I'm sacked?

CARSON: It means I shall be pleased when we learn the identity of your next employer, Mr Barrow.

 

INT. LIBRARY

 

Robert tells how is going to happen.

 

ROBERT: We'd stay with Rosamund, drive to the track, have lunch, see some racing and come home the following day. It's so unnecessary in your state.

CORA: But I'm not in a state.

ROBERT: Unless it's a state of boredom. Please let me.

CORA: It's not my decision.

ROBERT: If you mean that, then we're going.

TOM: Edith?

EDITH: Oh, I'm in if Bertie's coming.

ROBERT: It's a long way for him.

EDITH: Maybe there's something else for him to do in London.

MARY: Isn't it enough that it's a chance to see you?

EDITH: Would it annoy you if it were?

 

EXT. SERVANTS COURT

 

Thomas smokes, Hughes comes in to throat some flowers.

 

HUGHES: I'm sorry if Mr Carson spoke harshly just now. He doesn't mean to be unkind. But it worries him when a plan is delayed.

THOMAS: The plan being my departure.

HUGHES: You just haven't found the right person yet, Mr Barrow. But I'm sure there are friends out there waiting for you, and a new job in a new house may help you to find them.

THOMAS: Well, you see, Mrs Hughes, this is the first place I've found where I've laid down some roots.

 

EXT. LORD MERTON’S HOUSE

 

Violet comes in.

 

INT. LORD MERTON’S HOUSE

 

Amelia enters.

 

AMELIA: I'm terribly sorry, Lady Grantham. No-one told me you were coming and I'm afraid Lord Merton's out.

VIOLET: It's you I've come to see.

AMELIA: How flattering. May I offer you anything?

VIOLET: Only your attention. Shall I sit here? Now, Mrs Crawley tells me that you paid her a visit when you first came, that you were amazingly friendly.

AMELIA: Well, I hope I'm always friendly.

VIOLET: Nobody's always friendly. And now you have invited her to your wedding, which has taken her by surprise.

AMELIA: You mean Larry and Mrs Crawley have not seen eye to eye in the past.

VIOLET: Larry Grey has spoken to Mrs Crawley in a manner that in any other century would have resulted in him being called out and shot.

AMELIA: I can't believe it was as bad as that.

VIOLET: Then you are misinformed. But I want to know this. Why encourage Mrs Crawley when your fiance detests the mere idea of her?

AMELIA: I still dispute that, but I would say that Larry had perhaps not quite thought matters through.

VIOLET: Meaning?

AMELIA: Only that his father is old, and alone, and in need of...

VIOLET: In need of care? Which you are not prepared to give.

AMELIA: I would've said a companion.

VIOLET: Which you are not prepared to be. And what of this house? Will you surrender it to be free of him?

AMELIA: She won't want to live at Cavenham after Lord Merton's death. It would be lonely for a woman like her.

VIOLET: But, by heaven, I bet it won't be too lonely for a woman like you. I expect they'll have to drag you out as you break your fingernails catching at the door case. So, there we have it. You want a free nurse to take her tiresome old man off your hands. You're a cruel, little Miss, aren't you? I'd feel sorry for Larry, if I didn't dislike him so much.

AMELIA: I shall forget you said that, but you should go now. Much more, and we may feel awkward when we meet. Which we are bound to do.

VIOLET: I think not, Miss Cruikshank. Not if I see you first.

 

INT. SERVANTS’ ROOM

 

CARSON: Er, as you may have gathered, the family will be away for three days next week, so if any of you feel you're owed some time off, perhaps you could take it then. Er, but clear it with me first.

MRS PATMORE: I've put in the advertisement. It'll be out in the morning.

HUGHES: So, now you just have to be patient.

CARSON: What's this?

HUGHES: Mrs Patmore is ready for her first visitors to the guest house.

CARSON: That was quick.

HUGHES: Yeah, just what I said.

MRS PATMORE: I've got butterflies.

HUGHES: Oh, don't be silly.

MRS PATMORE: I'll go over to check it all when they're in London.

HUGHES: Oh, I'll come with you if you like.

THOMAS: Everyone has something to do on their free days, except me.

CARSON: We know what you've got to do, Mr Barrow.

THOMAS: Yes, Mr Carson.

 

INT. GRANTHAM’S HOUSE, SERVANTS’ ROOM

 

DENKER: Well! If that doesn't just take the biscuit.

SPRATT: Are you going to tell me or not?

DENKER: She's only decided to up sticks and set sail for the South of France.

SPRATT: When?

DENKER: The family are in London next week for the racing, so she wants to leave while they're away.

SPRATT: She can't do that!

DENKER: No? Well, perhaps you'll pop up and tell her. Save me packing.

SPRATT: What happens to you?

DENKER: What do you think? I go with her. I don't know… strolling along the Croisette, dining in Juan-les-Pins. It's a burden I can bear.

SPRATT: And what about me?

DENKER: You stay here, sticking in stamps.

SPRATT: And so, she's going to sneak off while they're away from home?

DENKER: My Lady doesn't sneak, thank you very much. If there's any sneaking to be done, I'll leave it to you.

(The ring bells)

DENKER: Must go. So much to do.

 

INT. CORA AND ROBERT’S BEDROOM

 

CORA: It's a nuisance, but I can't help it. Two dinners, neither very grand,... and clothes for Brooklands.

BAXTER: Very good, My Lady. I'm sorry if you're not keen. I am.

CORA: I just worry about getting Mr Talbot's hopes up.

ROBERT: Well, I'm curious about the fellow.

CORA: Listen, I like him a lot, but I don't believe a professional driver with very little to look forward to will make her happy. Sybil, maybe. But not Mary.

ROBERT: Well, that's the whole point. What's he got that fascinates Mary when poor old Tony's rolling acres and glistening coronet didn't. You'll say sex-appeal, but isn't Mary too sensible?

CORA: We have a very contrary daughter.

ROBERT: Anyway, I've never been motor racing.

 

INT. MARY’S BEDROOM

 

MARY: Mr Talbot will fix it. You can help with the picnic, but you'll have to take the train. There won't be any room in the cars.

ANNA: Mr Bates is looking forward to it.

MARY: I wish I was.

ANNA: You don't have to go, you know.

MARY: I think I do. It's part of him, and I must get used to it.

ANNA: That sounds serious.

MARY: I suppose you don't approve.

ANNA: It's not for me to say, m'lady.

MARY: But do you approve?

ANNA: Mr Talbot seems a nice gentleman. I'm just not sure his life and your life fit together. I don't mean to offend you, m'lady.

MARY: I'm not offended. I'm troubled because I understand what you mean.

ANNA: They do say that opposites attract.

MARY: Yes, they attract. But do they live happily ever after?

 

INT. SERVANTS’ ROOM

 

Molesley and Baxter are still here, not to bed.

 

MOLESLEY: I think I'll go up in a minute.

BAXTER: How do you revise if he's testing your general knowledge? Surely, you'll either know it or you won't.

MOLESLEY: I just feel I have to do something.

BAXTER: Is it so important to you?

MOLESLEY: It's important I don't feel a fool.

BAXTER: You're not a fool. I'm the fool.

MOLESLEY: Why do you say that?

BAXTER: Because I still can't decide what to do about Coyle.

MOLESLEY: I don't know why not.

BAXTER: Maybe if I'd given evidence in court, but that never happened and as Her Ladyship said, "The story feels unfinished."

MOLESLEY: You sound as if you're going.

BAXTER: I need to be sure he has no power over me any more.

MOLESLEY: Will you tell me when you decide?

 

INT. YEW TREE FARM

 

Andy comes to help.

 

MR MASON: When Daisy said you'd like to help, I wondered if you could bring the books up to date a bit.

ANDY: Or tackle some of the heavy stuff?

MR MASON: Oh, there's nothing I can't do until we separate the piglets. But I've got to get on top of the figures. When can you come?

ANDY: I'm busy just now, as it happens.

MR MASON: Oh, well. Let me know when you can get away.

 

INT. GRANTHAM’S HOUSE

 

Violet tells Isobel she is leaving.

 

ISOBEL: You're leaving now? Today?

VIOLET: I'll spend tonight in London, then I'll sail on the SS Paris from Southampton tomorrow. We'll cruise around the Mediterranean, then I'm staying with the Broughams in Cannes. They keep asking me.

ISOBEL: Surrounded by foreigners.

VIOLET: My reason for travelling is to make myself eager to come home. A month among the French should manage it.

ISOBEL: Won't Robert be hurt?

VIOLET: Oh. Not as hurt as he would be if he knew why I was going. Now, can you give this to him when they get home?

ISOBEL: What if they want to contact you while you're away?

VIOLET: Well, I've... I've written to Tom. Told him how to reach me. He's the most sensible. Oh, by the way, I called on Miss Cruikshank.

ISOBEL: And was she behind that odd invitation?

VIOLET: The fact is, she wants you to take Dickie off her hands and out of her hair. I'd say your choice is harder now than before. You know, when we talked, you didn't want to come between a father and his sons.

ISOBEL: Well, what's changed?

VIOLET: Well, now you must decide whether to abandon him to his selfish and greedy children. I mean, is that kind or right?

ISOBEL: It's still a tug-of-war I have no wish to be part of.

VIOLET: Well, my guess is, when you take delivery from Miss Amelia you'll be lucky if you see a Christmas card.

 

EXT. BED AND BREAKFAST

 

Mrs Patmore has adjusted some detail before the opening.

 

HUGHES: Can you be ready by tomorrow night?

MRS PATMORE: Oh, it's just one couple.

HUGHES: Well, the house has been beautifully finished. No doubt about that. But there is a lot to think about. You don't offer dinner, do you?

MRS PATMORE: No, if they need dinner, they can go to the pub. But I would like to make a thing of my breakfasts. I want a reputation for them.

HUGHES: You'll manage that easily enough.

MRS PATMORE: I'm here again tomorrow, but should I come back on Thursday morning? The family will still be in London, and Daisy could easily do the servants' hall breakfast.

HUGHES: I have no objection.

MRS PATMORE: Now, dinner with Mr Carson. Why not tomorrow night when they're away?

HUGHES: I suppose we could eat at a normal time, for once.

MRS PATMORE: Ah, well, you could and you couldn't,... because I've had an idea.

 

INT. THE SKETCH

 

Edith make an appearance for the news.

 

LAURA: Oh, hello, stranger.

EDITH: I'm not really here. I'm racing at Brooklands tomorrow, and I thought I'd pop in and see what's new.

LAURA: Not much. Oh, although, we have had an offer today. I was going to ask you what you thought. Er, her name is Miss Cassandra Jones. She thinks we ought to have an advice column.

EDITH: With her dispensing it?

LAURA: Yes, but I must say her samples are quite funny. "Your husband is losing interest? Well, here's step one. Take a look in the mirror."

EDITH: What are you proposing?

LAURA: We'll invent some problems, she can write the answers, then see how the public likes it. There's nothing new in an agony column, of course, but they're very popular in America, which means they're due a revival here.

EDITH: Should we interview her?

LAURA: No, let's leave it until we decide to go forward. I think it's worth a try. I've never seen motor racing close up.

EDITH: My sister's new boyfriend drives. Why not come?

LAURA: I'm not sure I should.

EDITH: Well, I'm your employer, so if I think it's all right then it must be. You can meet my family, if you're strong enough.

 

INT. GRANTHAM’S HOUSE, LONDON

 

The family diner.

 

ROBERT: Looking round the table, I wonder if we ought to have opened Grantham House. I feel rather guilty.

ROSAMUND: Oh, don't.

ROBERT: I know what a palaver it is.

CORA: More so, now there's no real staff. Almost everyone we know is selling their London house. But I suppose that's not for me to say.

EDITH: I went past the site of Devonshire House on my way home. There's something vast going up in its place.

ROSAMUND: Flats and offices and salerooms.

TOM: People don't want vast palaces any more, even if they can afford them.

ROBERT: They were fun, though. In my youth, all the great hostesses used to have luncheon laid for 20 every day. And if you turned up in time, you just sat down to a lovely feed.

 

Henry enters in the room.

 

HENRY: I'm so sorry, Lady Rosamund, I thought dinner would be finished.

ROSAMUND: And so it should be. We'll go through. Unless the boys prefer to stay and talk racing cars.

HENRY: I think I'd rather join the ladies.

ROBERT: Like Lord Byron?

HENRY: Hmm. Well done for rounding them all up. I'm very grateful.

TOM: Don't be. I'm as keen as you are.

MARY: It's a bit obvious. Dropping in uninvited after dinner.

HENRY: I hope it is obvious. Obvious that I want to be a part of this family.

MARY: Don't I have a say in the matter?

HENRY: I want to surround you with people murmuring, "Isn't he divine?" Or "You'd be mad to let him go."

MARY: Suppose they say, "I shouldn't have thought a racing driver was your sort of thing at all"?

HENRY: They don't have to, you've already said it.

MARY: I'm afraid there's a list as long as your arm of people who are coming tomorrow.

HENRY: Hmm. Just give me the list and I'll sort it out. Did you mind my inviting your family without telling you?

MARY: I'm here, aren't I? Let's get some coffee.

 

INT. SERVANTS’ ROOM

 

Servants eat.

 

CARSON: Are you prepared for your exams?

DAISY: I've done as much as I'm able.

CARSON: No-one can say more. I confess, I wasn't always sure about it, but now you've got there, well done. I wish you every good fortune.

MRS PATMORE: I wonder where she'll go from here.

HUGHES: Doesn't Gwen's visit show us that in the new century anything is possible? And what about you, Mr Molesley, are you ready?

MOLESLEY: I think so, hmm. Ready as I'll ever be.

MRS PATMORE: I'll walk down with some lunch for you and Daisy and Mr Dawes.

MOLESLEY: Oh, you don't have to.

MRS PATMORE: No, I'd like to.

ANDY: I'll give you a hand.

HUGHES: Mr Barrow, what are you doing with your free time tomorrow?

THOMAS: Scanning the jobs column, Mrs Hughes, what else?

 

INT. CAR RACE TRACK

 

Tom fixes a thing in Henry’s car.

TOM: There, that's got it. I think you're all set. It's a good car.

HENRY: Clearly, we need you on the team.

TOM: Don't tempt me, Henry.

 

They meet Edith and her editor.

 

TOM: Who's this?

EDITH: Laura Edmunds, my editor. Laura, this is Tom Branson, my brother-in-law, and the man of the hour, Mr Henry Talbot.

HENRY: Hello.

 

They joins the rest of the group.

 

EDITH: My sister, Mary. These are my parents. You can sort them out in your own time.

ROBERT: Nice to meet you at last.

LAURA: Lord Grantham, Lady Grantham.

EDITH: This is Charlie Rogers. He drives on Henry's team.

CHARLIE: Henry's team, is it? When I beat him into a cocked hat every time.

HENRY: Oh, he's just showing off. I'm faster, I'm younger and better.

CHARLIE: But not at driving.

TOM: I wish there was something more I could do to be useful.

HENRY: Oh, just cheer, Tom.

TOM: I don't have to be asked.

 

Mary and Henry are going to take some food.

 

MARY: I don't know why I'm doing this. I can't even swallow.

HENRY: It's all terribly swank, not a bit what we're used to.

MAYR: No?

HENRY: Normally, it's an oil-stained sandwich and a bottle of pop.

MARY: Well, I'm glad to think we've brought an improvement.

HENRY: Thank you.

 

Bertie is arrived.

 

BERTIE: My train sat in a tunnel for an hour. Anyway, I'm here now.

EDITH: Come and meet Miss Edmunds.

 

The family talks with Laura.

 

ROSMAUND: Is it hard to be a woman editor? Fleet Street sounds so very tough.

LAURA: It's hard to be a woman anything if it isn't domestic. But I do my best.

ROBERT: I think it's courageous and good.

CORA: Heavens! Papa's conversion to the modern world is almost complete.

EDITH: Don't be deceived. He'd still like to see us happy wives and mothers.

(Edith and Bertie joins them)

BERTIE: That's not fair. Even leopards can change some of their spots.

ROBERT: Quite. Now, there's still some food.

LAURA: I'm glad no-one seems unhappy that Lady Edith hired a woman.

TOM: You're a big improvement on the last editor, that's for sure. And you're not the only one around here who's broken a few barriers. I started my life at Downton Abbey as the chauffeur.

 

HENRY: I think we're being summoned.

CHARLIE: The cars are in place. We should go.

HENRY: Right behind you.

CHARLIE: You'll stay there if I have my way.

 

HENRY: I can't begin to tell you what it means to me that you came today.

MARY: I hope so, because my digestive system has packed up completely.

HENRY: I'm going to be fine. Mary, you must credit me with some skill. Now, when I pass you, I expect to see you cheer and wave.

MAYR: Does praying count?

CHARLIE: Henry!

HENRY: Coming.

(Henry kisses Mary)

HENRY: Well, that should keep my spirits up. I'll see you in a minute.

 

Henry is coming to the track.

 

RACE COMMENTATOR: 'We're just waiting for the last chap... And here he comes. It's Henry Talbot, driving car No.14.'

HENRY: Good luck, Charlie.

CHARLIE: Good luck, old boy.

RACE COMMENTATOR: 'Now, any moment, the flag will fall and the race will begin.'

 

After an instant, the flag falls, the pilot runs into their car.

 

RACE COMMENTATOR: 'Just listen to the roar of those engines, ladies and gentlemen. And they're off. There they go, tearing down the street and jostling for first position.'

TOM: Come on, Charlie!

BERTIE: Here they come!

ROBERT: Come on, Talbot!

ROSMAUND: I don't think you can shout that. Isn't Talbot the name of a car?

ROBERT: I can't shout "Come on, Henry." They might all be called Henry.

MARY: Oh, my God, here they are.

EDITH: Come on!

CORA: When will it be over?

MARY: Not soon, they go round and round.

TOM: Yes! Come on! Come on! God bless you! Come on!

MARY: What's the point? What do they get out of it?

TOM: What do you think? Speed.

 

EXT. PARK

 

Mrs Patmore, Molesley, Daisy, Andy and Mr Dawes eat.

 

MR DAWES: This is kind of you, Mrs Patmore.

MRS PATMORE: I meant to bring some lemonade, but I left it on the kitchen table. I could kick meself.

(Thomas comes in)

THOMAS: Is this what you mean?

MRS PATMORE: Oh, that was kind of you, Mr Barrow. Thank you.

THOMAS: How were the exams? Did you do well?

MOLESLEY: We can't know the answer to that, can we, Mr Dawes?

MR DAWES: You'll find out soon enough. But Daisy will have to wait a while.

DAISY: I've not finished yet. I've got three more papers after lunch.

ANDY: Was it harder than you thought?

DAISY: See for yourself. What about number two? It knocked me for a loop, I can tell you.

MRS PATMORE: What does it say? Read it out, Andy.

THOMAS: I'll read it.

DAISY: Why, what's the matter?

ANDY: "Tsar... Nic... holas..."

THOMAS: Here, give it here. "Tsar Nicholas I called Turkey 'the sick man of Europe'. What were the causes of Turkey's illness and what measure was the Russian Tsar prescribing for its recovery?"

ANDY: I can't read, Mr Molesley. At least Mr Barrow's been trying to teach me to read, but I'm too stupid to learn.

DAISY: Don't say that.

ANDY: So, there we have it. I'm a fool who knows nothing. I am nothing.

 

INT. CAR RACE TRACK

 

RACE COMMENTATOR: 'The race is going to hot up now because the lead car, car No.6, has withdrawn with what looks like radiator trouble. Oh, dear. It looks like Sir Patrick has blown a gasket too!'

BERTIE: Here they come again.

TOM: My God, but don't you envy them?

EDITH: No, I don't.

BERTIE: Nor me. We're going to have to keep an eye on Tom.

ROBERT: There is something gallant and daring in it, even I can see that.

 

EXT. PARK

 

MR DAWES: Andy, maybe I can help, if you'd like me to.

MRS PATMORE: Oh, that's very kind. What do you say, Andy?

ANDY: Well, I've tried and tried with Mr Barrow, and I can't break through. I'm too stupid.

DAISY: Will you stop saying that?

MR DAWES: You're not stupid, and I promise you I can soon have you reading for pleasure. If you'll just come two or three times a week after school closes. Could you manage that?

ANDY: That's the best time for me. It won't take long, you'll see.

THOMAS: We can go on with...

MR DAWES: Mr Barrow, it might be better if you step back now. You've been very generous, but we wouldn't want to confuse Andy with different methods.

THOMAS: No, of course not.

MOLESLEY: I hate to cut this short, but Daisy's still got a lot of work to do and she better get started.

THOMAS: Need any help?

ANDY: I can manage. Well, good luck, Daisy.

MRS PATMORE: Yes, good luck.

 

INT. LIBRARY

 

Carson and Hughes seat in the catch.

 

HUGHES: Funny when the house is empty above decks and below.

CARSON: All the more reason for us to be vigilant.

HUGHES: Let's sit down.

CARSON: Erm, I don't know.

HUGHES: Oh, just for a moment.

CARSON: Hmm.

HUGHES: There. That's nice, isn't it? They don't live badly, you have to concede.

CARSON: They live as they're supposed to live. It has its burdens and its benefits.

HUGHES: Better than a life of just burden. I hope you're ready for tonight. For once, we can eat when civilised people eat, so don't be late back.

CARSON: Are you sure you know how to cook it?

HUGHES: Don't you worry. I've been through every detail with Mrs Patmore.

(Thomas enters)

THOMAS: Hello. What have we here? Can anyone join in?

CARSON: No, Mr Barrow, they cannot.

 

INT. CAR RACE TRACK

 

RACE COMMENTATOR: 'It's shaping up to be a tight battle for the winner's laurels. What's this? The No.8 Bentley is slowing down! It's pulled in at the side of the track. Looks like steering trouble. And there goes Rogers! Rogers has taken the lead and now look! Henry Talbot in car No.14 tries to snatch the lead away from him. Here he comes again! Talbot attacking from the inside and challenging for the lead. I don't think Rogers has the power to fight him off! Oh, dear, look! Rogers is coming back at him! Would you believe it? He's going to take back the lead! What a stunning piece of driving by Charles Rogers!'

MAN: And here they come again, it's the two Bentleys neck and neck past the grandstand. Come on, Bentley boys! Come on!

TOM: Chin up. Won't be long now.

MARY: Really? It feels as if we're trapped in some witch's curse for all eternity.

 

They heard a crash car.

 

RACE COMMENTATOR: 'This is terrible. This is awful!'

TOM: Stay here. Bertie, come with me.

BERTIE: Of course.

MARY: No, it's no good. I can't stay.

CORA: You're not going anywhere.

 

ANNA: I must go to her!

BATES: No, no, Anna. Not in your condition.

ANNA: Never mind, I have to go.

BATES: Can you follow her, please?

BAXTER: Of course.

 

The car is in fire. Henry try to rescue Charlie.

 

MAN: Get him out of there!

HENRY: Charlie!

MAN: Turn around!

HENRY: Charlie!

TOM: It's too late. Henry, Henry, get back! Henry, Henry, get back!

HENRY: Charlie!

TOM: He's gone, Henry.

HENRY: No! Charlie! Charlie! We have to help him. Charlie! Charlie!

 

MARY: Let me pass. I know him. Let me pass!

EDITH: You can't say that. We don't know it's him.

MARY: Oh, my God.

Tom: I need help here!

MARY: Who is it?

EDITH: Can we find out who it is? Tom, Bertie, who is it?

BERTIE: I'm afraid it's Charlie Rogers.

 

Few hours later, Henry smoke alone. Mary joins him.

 

HENRY: He was my friend. My best friend, really. If that phrase didn't sound like it was something from a... Rider Haggard novel. I keep asking myself if I... encouraged him.

MARY: Of course you encouraged him, and he encouraged you.

HENRY: Yes, but I'm so stupid, I... I... I needled him and I teased him, I pushed him.

MARY: And he did the same. And if you'd have died instead of him, he'd be here asking exactly the same questions.

HENRY: Yes, but I didn't die and he did! I'm sorry. I'm sorry.

MARY: We're going now. Aunt Rosamund doesn't want to cancel dinner tonight. She thinks we should all be together on a day like today.

HENRY: I can't. I have to deal with Charlie's family.

MARY: Of course. I wasn't thinking.

HENRY: Tell her thank you. And, Mary...

MARY: No. Let's not do any of that stuff now.

 

EXT. DOWNTON ABBEY

 

Mr Dawes comes in.

 

INT. SERVANTS’ ROOM

 

Mr Dawes announces the good news.

 

MRS PATMORE: Go on, then. Put us out of our misery. Did he pass or not?

MR DAWES: Mr Molesley, I'd be very glad if you would join the teaching staff at the village school.

MRS PATMORE: Well, I'll be...

MOLESLEY: Very good of you to come up tonight to tell me.

MRS PATMORE: Does that mean you'll be a teacher and not a servant?

DAISY: When will you be leaving?

MR DAWES: Give him a moment. There's a lot to be settled.

MOLESLEY: Course there is.

MR DAWES: I'm impressed, Mr Molesley. There are Oxford and Cambridge graduates who know far less than you. You should be proud. Good night.

MOLESLEY: Mr Dawes. Thank you very much.

ANDY: Well done, Mr Molesley.

MOLESLEY: It'll be you next.

ANDY: I doubt it, but thanks.

MRS PATMORE: We should celebrate. Come into the kitchen while I get the dinner going. There's a bottle of wine there, if Mr Carson wouldn't mind.

DAISY: Is that the end of service for you?

MOLESLEY: Hmm, service is ending for most of us, Daisy. I've just got a head start.

DAISY: Will you miss it?

MOLESLEY: Oh, let's face it. I were never going to make butler. Well, not in a proper house like this one. And from now on, there's going to be more and more people chasing fewer and fewer jobs, so it's probably time. And this seemed like a good way to go.

DAISY: Well, I'm glad. You deserve it.

MOLESLEY: I never think I deserve anything. Perhaps I've been wrong all along.

ANDY: Are you coming, Mr Barrow?

THOMAS: In a minute. You go ahead.

MRS PATMORE: Here you are, Daisy, you have one. Andy, come on. Have a glass of wine.

DAISY: Congratulations.

(Thomas stays in the servants’ room alone)

 

INT. CARSON AND HUGHES’S COTTAGE

 

Hughes can’t cook.

 

CARSON: But how did you do it?

HUGHES: Er, I must have stumbled and fallen over in the wrong way. Mrs Patmore put on a bandage, but I'll go to the doctor in the morning if it's no better.

CARSON: But how are you going to cook?

HUGHES: I can't cook! I can't lift. But it's not difficult. I'll talk you through it, don't worry.

CARSON: You mean... I'm going to cook?!

HUGHES: It's very straightforward. Now, get the chicken in the oven right away, then peel the potatoes and prepare the cauliflower. Oh, and put a kettle on to boil. You should find bread and an onion for the bread sauce. Butter and milk are in the meat safe outside.

 

INT. GRANTHAM HOUSE, LONDON

 

The family aren’t very hungry.

 

ROSAMUND: I assume that none of us are going to eat anything else.

LAURA: One talks of risk and danger, and it sounds like fun. But of course, the reality behind it is sudden death.

MARY: Sudden, stupid, wasteful death.

ROBERT: It was a bloody awful business. A bloody, bloody awful business.

ROSAMUND: The English language never lets you down.

ROBERT: Oh, shut up! Shall we go through?

CORA: You're going to bed.

ROSAMUND: Me, too. The rest of you can talk into the small hours.

BERTIE: Should I say goodbye?

EDITH: Not yet. Come into the drawing room for a drink.

TOM: Henry's on the telephone.

MARY: Tell him to ring tomorrow.

TOM: I think you should speak to him.

 

INT. GRANTHAM HOUSE, LONDON / INT. HENRY’S HOUSE

 

Mary is at phone with Henry.

 

MARY: 'You should try to sleep.'

HENY: I found that I had to hear your voice first. The truth is... I won't sleep until I know where we're headed.

MARY: Henry, please let's not do this now. Think of Charlie, not us.

HENRY: Hear me out. Charlie would have. Because his death has made me realise we don't have a minute to waste, you and I. This is my carpe diem moment. I... I must seize the day.

MARY: No.

HENRY: What do you mean?

MARY: I'm sorry, I wouldn't have said this now, but today has made me realise something, too. We're not meant to be together, Henry. We're not right.

HENRY: I can...

MARY: Don't start saying you'll give up racing. I don't want you to give up anything except me.

HENRY: I can't give you up.

MARY: Please. I wish you nothing but good. I want you to have a long and happy life. Just not with me.

HENRY: Mary, please don't do this.

MARY: I must. Good night, Henry.

 

INT. GRANTHAM HOUSE, LONDON

 

Mary hangs up, Tom joins her.

 

TOM: I wish you wouldn't.

MARY: Do you know the worst thing? When they said it was Charlie and not Henry who was dead, I was glad! Think of that. I was glad!

TOM: You're not seeing straight. Today brought up Matthew's death and all the rest of it. You're in a black mist.

MARY: It's not what I want!

TOM: You're frightened of being hurt again. But let me tell you this. You will be hurt again, and so will I, because being hurt is part of being alive. But that is no reason to give up on the man who is right for you.

INT. CARSON AND HUGHES’S COTTAGE

 

CARSON: I'm sorry I'm a bit behind. The potatoes may have caught.

HUGHES: Never mind. Er, how's the cauliflower?

CARSON: Oh, God.

HUGHES: Oh, while you're there, put in the apple crumble. Bottom oven.

CARSON: Mmm.

 

INT. KITCHENS

 

MRS PATMORE: I think it's been a good day.

DAISY: The funny thing is, I quite enjoyed it in the end. I'm glad it's turned out well for Mr Molesley.

MRS PATMORE: And Andy. I think that'll turn out well an' all.

DAISY: I suppose so. Even if he only wants to read to learn more about farming from Mr Mason.

MRS PATMORE: And if he does? You must share, Daisy. Love isn't finite. If Mr Mason makes new friends, it doesn't mean he has any less love for you.

DAISY: Doesn't it? I never had much that was my own, you know.

MRS PATMORE: Well, you found the love of a father there and you can count on him. Just as you can count on me. Now, run along and I'll finish this.

 

INT. CARSON AND HUGHES’S COTTAGE

 

HUGHES: Mmm. This crumble's good. My mother's was always a bit soggy.

(Carson sleeps)

CARSON: Hmm, crumble. Oh! Is that it now? Are we done?

HUGHES: Oh, just put the things in to soak. Make sure you cover the pots with water. You don't have to do the washing up till tomorrow if you don't want to.

CARSON: You won't be better by the morning?

HUGHES: Oh, not for that. We could ask Billy to come over, but he's got his own work to do. You don't mind, do you?

CARSON: No, I don't mind.

 

INT. GRANTHAM HOUSE, LONDON

 

Anna meets Baxter in the hallway.

 

ANNA: I expect you're glad to get to bed. I know I am. What is it?

BAXTER: I just wondered if I was right. That you're to be congratulated.

ANNA: It's a bit early to shout about it, but yes.

BAXTER: I'm happy for you. It's good to think of a new life coming, especially on a day like this.

ANNA: Well, good night.

 

She enters in her room.

 

ANNA: Look at you, stretched out like a pasha. A creature of leisure.

BATES: Early night for me. He went to bed when he left the dining room.

ANNA: Not for me. She's very shaken.

BATES: By the crash?

ANNA: Because of the crash, and she's broken up with Mr Talbot.

BATES: I wouldn't have thought it was the right night to make that sort of decision.

ANNA: She says she's sure.

BATES: Do you think she's right?

ANNA: I don't know. Probably.

BATES: Then there's no more to be said.

 

Bertie and Edith are here, alone.

 

BERTIE: I'm afraid I've got to go.

EDITH: You've been such a help. It's odd, isn't it? We witnessed a tragedy today but, sitting here with your arm around me, I can't remember feeling so comfortable.

BERTIE: When you say things like that, you make me so happy. If it isn't wrong to feel happy on a day like this.

EDITH: I don't believe it's ever wrong to feel happy and confident in someone else's company.

BERTIE: Do I really make you feel those things?

EDITH: It's not a trap. Today has been sad and wretched, and having you here has helped me face it, that's all.

BERTIE: The thing is, I'd like to be trapped, and... Well, I better just say it. I want to marry you.

EDITH: Oh!

BERTIE: You're not offended?

EDITH: Offended? Why would I be offended? I'm thrilled, I'm delighted. I'm just rather surprised.

BERTIE: Why? You know I'm mad about you.

EDITH: I don't ever think I'm the sort of girl men are mad about.

BERTIE: Then you're wrong, because I am. I... I know I've not got much to offer and your father's probably hoping for more than a penniless land agent, but if love is allowed to weigh in the balance, I've got plenty of that.

EDITH: I must ask you something. Would you let me bring Marigold with me?

BERTIE: Marigold? Your family's ward?

EDITH: You see, I'm much fonder of her than anyone else, and I'd hate to leave her behind.

BERTIE: If she means that much to you. Of course, I hope we'll have children of our own before close of play.

EDITH: Oh, absolutely. I'd like that, too.

BERTIE: Does that mean you accept?

EDITH: Not quite. I'll have to think about it. I'm sorry to be a killjoy, but I must.

BERTIE: Be my guest. I'm not going to marry anyone else. Not until after you've broken my heart, anyway. I'll go.

EDITH: Kiss me first. And I promise I won't keep you waiting too long.

 

INT. BED AND BREAKFAST

 

Mrs Patmore serves her first customer.

 

MRS PATMORE: All right, let's see what you make of that. Now, I must be off, but my niece, Lucy, is in the kitchen. She'll see to everything.

MAN: Thank you.

WOMAN: Thank you.

(A paparazzo watches her in the out)

 

EXT./ INT. FRONT DOOR

 

The family is back.

 

ROBERT: Hello, Carson.

CARSON: Mrs Crawley is in the library, My Lord. She's been here for some time.

CORA: Why?

CARSON: She didn't say, My Lady, but she seems eager to see you all. Also, er, Mr Spratt rang to ask when you'd be arriving from London.

ROBERT: Mr Spratt?

CARSON: The Dowager Countess' butler.

ROBERT: Oh, that Mr Spratt. What did he want?

CARSON: Again, no explanation was proffered.

ROBERT: Curiouser and curiouser.

 

INT. LIBRARY

 

Isobel is waiting.

 

ROBERT: Isobel, I hope we haven't kept you waiting for hours.

ISOBEL: Not at all, it's entirely my fault. I got here far too early. How was it?

CORA: Perfectly terrible, as it happens, but let's not go into that now.

ISOBEL: Oh, I am sorry. And, to be quite honest, I feel rather awkward.

MARY: Why, what is it?

ISOBEL: I have a letter from Cousin Violet.

ROBERT: Why didn't she bring it herself?

ISOBEL: Because she's gone away.

EDITH: Gone away? Where?

ISOBEL: She's on board the Paris, headed for the Mediterranean.

CORA: This is me, isn't it? I've done it. She's furious with me.

ISOBEL: I don't see the point of bringing any of that up now.

MARY: What does it say in the letter?

ROBERT: Nothing much. She needs a change of air, and Spratt is bringing a present by way of goodbye. That's why he rang.

CARSON: Mr Spratt has arrived, My Lord.

ROBERT: Oh, show him in.

CARSON: Well, that is, he's in the servants' hall with a present for Your Lordship and he doesn't want to bring it up here.

ROBERT: What is going on?

CARSON: He may be right, My Lord.

TOM: Let's go and see what it is.

ROBERT: If you wish, but it all seems very rum to me.

 

INT. SERVANTS’ ROOM

 

ROBERT: What is it? What's the surprise?

HUGHES: You'll soon see, m'lord, but I think it's a good one.

SPRATT: Good day, m'lord.

ROBERT: Spratt, what is this great secret you're about to reveal?

SPRATT: Her Ladyship chose her herself, m'lord. Er, she was most particular.

(It’s a puppy)

ROBERT: Oh! Hello, little one! Oh! Now, what are we going to call you, eh? Oh, I know, Tiaa.

EDITH: I thought we always had names from ancient Egypt.

ROBERT: Tiaa was a wife of Amenhotep II and the mother of Thutmose IV. Don't you know anything?

SPRATT: She's not exactly trained yet, m'lord. So we decided against bringing her up to the library.

ROBERT: Oh, I don't care about that. You're coming upstairs with me. Tom, what about this, eh?

 

Hughes and Mrs Patmore go to the kitchens.

 

HUGHES: He does love his dogs. How were your guests this morning? Was everything satisfactory?

MRS PATMORE: Oh, very. He was a doctor, Mrs Hughes. Imagine that! So, I don't think I could have started better. Even if I did work harder over their breakfast than anything I've done since Lady Rose got married. Oh, talking of which, has Mr Carson survived his ordeal from last night?

HUGHES: Put it this way… he has discovered a new respect for the role of cook and bottle washer. So I think he'll be giving less trouble in the future.

(Carson comes in)

CARSON: What's so funny?

HUGHES: Just life, Mr Carson. Just life.

 

End of the episode.

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Plus que quelques heures pour m'envoyer vos Chicago! Et tentez de gagner une carte Boden!

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Chers fans de The tudors à l'occasion de la fête de mères nous vous proposons un concours d'écriture !

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Il s'agit de rédiger un texte liant une mère de la série à son enfant !

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Nous vous attendons nombreux

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On est pas en espagne ou au portugal !

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Tu sors dehors t'es grillé comme un poulet !

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Ou un canard dans ton cas

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Non moi = Quake !

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Coin coin !^^

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